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Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary February 2007
[Summaries and Track Data] [Prepared by Gary Padgett]

                   MONTHLY GLOBAL TROPICAL CYCLONE SUMMARY

                                FEBRUARY, 2007

  (For general comments about the nature of these summaries, as well as
  information on how to download the tabular cyclone track files, see
  the Author's Note at the end of this summary.)


      ********** SPECIAL NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR - PLEASE READ **********

     The tropical cyclone reports for the Southwest Indian Ocean basin this
  month have a new look.  The idea of following a structured template to
  present basic information was suggested by Matthew Saxby of Queanbeyan, 
  New South Wales.  I have taken Matthew's idea, modified it some, and sent
  it around to several persons to be vetted.  The response I've received to
  this new format has been very favorable.   Barring some unforeseen
  complication, beginning with the March, 2007, edition, all the tropical
  cyclone reports will be constructed in this new format.

     As can be seen from the Southwest Indian cyclone reports below, the
  new format is as follows:

  (1) Section A - General Information

      This section will contain salient information about the cyclone in
      a very structured format, allowing for quick comparison between
      cyclones.  Dates and intensities are based upon the operational 
      tracks prepared by the author.

  (2) Section B - Synoptic History

      This section will contain a narrative description of the origin of 
      the cyclone and a general description of its track history.   To  
      realize the full benefit of the summaries, readers should use this 
      section in conjunction with the tabular tracks prepared by the 
      author and the track graphic maps prepared by John Diebolt.   (The 
      Wikipedia reports also contain non-annotated track graphics.)   In 
      order for me to keep producing the summaries and to expedite the 
      production time required, the track description will not be as 
      detailed as in the past.  There will be no attempt to describe every 
      twist and turn of the track or every 5 or 10-kt fluctuation in 
      intensity.

  (3) Section C - Meteorological Data

      This section will be pretty much as before, reporting on all the
      significant observations I have available (and occasionally some
      not-so-significant ones).

  (4) Section D - Damage and Casualties

      This section will contain the same level of detail as before,
      relying heavily on links and the online Wikipedia reports.

  (5) Section E - Additional Discussion

      This section will contain any additional discussion related to
      differing intensity estimates, or any other items deemed to be of
      general interest.
      

  SPECIAL NOTE #2:  Very happily, John Diebolt of Tucson, Arizona, now has
  his tropical cyclone website up and running again and has begun once more
  to produce graphic images depicting the tracks of all tropical systems 
  for which I prepare a tabular track in the companion cyclone tracks file.
  These can be accessed at the following URL:

  http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/>

  Scroll down the chart to the month of interest and click on the green
  bar under "Operational Track Image" for the desired system.

  The tabular track of positions and intensities may also be obtained
  from the above website, or from the other archival sites listed in
  the Author's Note in the closing section of this summary.


  SPECIAL NOTE #3:  Short reports with satellite pictures and small-scale 
  maps for all the Southern Hemisphere systems may be found at the 
  following link:

  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006-07_Southern_Hemisphere_tropical_cyclone_season>

  *************************************************************************

                             FEBRUARY HIGHLIGHTS

   --> Significant tropical cyclone outbreak in Southwest Indian Ocean
   --> Gulf of Carpentaria cyclone affects northeastern Australia

  *************************************************************************

                    !!!!!!!!!! EXTRA FEATURE !!!!!!!!!!

                        2007 TROPICAL CYCLONE NAMES 

           TROPICAL CYCLONE NAMES for the NORTHWEST PACIFIC BASIN

     Beginning in 2000 tropical storms and typhoons forming in the North
  Pacific west of the Dateline are assigned names by JMA taken from a
  new list of Asian names contributed by fourteen nations and territories
  from the western Pacific and eastern Asia.   Names are not allocated
  in alphabetical order and the majority are not personal names--instead
  names of animals, plants, fictional characters, descriptive adjectives,
  places--even foods--are utilized.     The entire list consists of 140
  names and all names will be used before any are repeated.    The last
  name assigned in 2006 was Trami in December.   As of 28 March no
  tropical cyclones have been named in 2007.

     The next 36 names on the list are (** indicates name has already
  been assigned in 2007):

       Kong-rey          Danas             Kajiki            Halong
       Yutu              Nari              Faxai             Nakri
       Toraji            Wipha             Peipah            Fengshen
       Man-yi            Francisco         Tapah             Kalmaegi
       Usagi             Lekima            Mitag             Fung-wong
       Pabuk             Krosa             Hagibis           Kammuri
       Wutip             Haiyan            Noguri            Phanfone
       Sepat             Podul             Rammasun          Vongfong
       Fitow             Lingling          Matmo             Nuri

     Since 1963 PAGASA has independently named tropical cyclones forming
  in the Philippines' AOR--from 115E to 135E and from 5N to 25N (except
  for a portion of the northwestern corner of the above region).  Even
  though the Philippines contributed ten names to the international list
  of typhoon names, PAGASA still continues to assign their own names for
  local use within the Philippines.  It is felt that familiar names are
  more easily remembered in the rural areas and that having a PAGASA-
  assigned name helps to underscore the fact that the cyclone is within
  PAGASA's AOR and potentially a threat to the Philippines.    Another
  consideration may be PAGASA's desire to assign a name when a system is
  first classified as a tropical depression.    Since tropical and/or
  monsoon depressions can bring very heavy rainfall to the nation which
  often results in disastrous flooding, the weather service feels that
  assigning a name helps to enhance public attention given to a system.

     Beginning with 2001 PAGASA began using new sets of cyclone names.  
  These do not all end in "ng" as did the older names.  Four sets of 25
  names will be rotated annually; thus, the set for 2007 will be re-used
  in 2011.   In case more than 25 systems are named in one season, an
  auxiliary set will be used.   PAGASA names for 2007 are (** indicates 
  name has already been assigned in 2007):

           Amang               Juaning             Ramon
           Bebeng              Kabayan             Sendong
           Chedeng             Lando               Tisoy
           Dodong              Mina                Ursula
           Egay                Nonoy               Viring
           Falcon              Onyok               Weng
           Goring              Pedring             Yoyoy
           Hanna               Quiel               Zigzag
           Ineng

     In the unlikely event that the list is exhausted, the following
  names would be allocated as needed:  Abe, Berto, Charo, Dado, Estoy,
  Felion, Gening, Herman, Irma, and Jaime.


                     NORTH INDIAN OCEAN CYCLONE NAMES

     After several years of planning and working out implementation
  details, the RSMC for the North Indian Ocean basin--the Indian
  Meteorological Department--began naming tropical cyclones in that
  region on an experimental basis in the autumn of 2004.

     The procedure for allocating names is similar to that used in the
  Northwest Pacific basin.  All the member nations--eight in this case--
  submitted eight names each.    The 64 names were arranged in eight
  columns of eight names, ordered by the contributing nations in alpha-
  betical order, just as is done in the Northwest Pacific.  Potential
  cyclonic storms for 2007 include (** indicates name has already been
  assigned):

           Akash                 Nargis                Bijli
           Gonu                  Abe                   Aila
           Yemyin                Khai Muk              Phyan
           Sidr                  Nisha                 Ward

***************************************************************************
  
                             ACTIVITY BY BASINS

  ATLANTIC (ATL) - North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico

  Activity for February:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHEAST PACIFIC (NEP) - North Pacific Ocean East of Longitude 180

  Activity for February:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHWEST PACIFIC (NWP) - North Pacific Ocean West of Longitude 180

  Activity for February:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  NORTH INDIAN OCEAN (NIO) - Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea

  Activity for February:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  SOUTHWEST INDIAN OCEAN (SWI) - South Indian Ocean West of Longitude 90E

  Activity for February:  1 severe tropical storm
                          1 tropical cyclone
                          3 intense tropical cyclones **

  ** - one of these formed late in January and continued to near the
       middle of February


                          Sources of Information
                          ----------------------

     The primary sources of tracking and intensity information for
  Southwest Indian Ocean tropical cyclones are the warnings issued by
  the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre on La Reunion Island, part of
  Meteo France (MFR), and the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre
  for the basin.    However, tropical cyclones in this region are named 
  by the Sub-regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Centres in Mauritius and 
  Madagascar with longitude 55E being the demarcation line between their 
  respective areas of naming responsibility.  The La Reunion centre only 
  advises these agencies regarding the intensity of tropical systems.  
  References to sustained winds imply a 10-minute averaging period unless
  otherwise stated.

     In the companion tropical cyclone tracks file, I occasionally
  annotate positions from warnings issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning
  Center (JTWC) of the U. S. Air Force and Navy, located at Pearl
  Harbor, Hawaii, when they differ from MFR's coordinates by usually
  40-50 nm or more.  The JTWC warnings are also the source of the
  1-minute average maximum sustained wind values included in the
  tracks file.    Additionally, information describing details of
  satellite imagery and atmospheric circulation features included in
  the narratives is often gleaned from the JTWC warnings.


            Southwest Indian Ocean Tropical Activity for February
            -----------------------------------------------------

     As the month of February opened, Intense Tropical Cyclone Dora was
  slowly gathering strength as it pursued a south-southwesterly track
  which carried it near Rodrigues Island and then well to the east of
  Mauritius and La Reunion.  Dora peaked at 100 kts on the 3rd while
  northeast of Rodrigues and was the second cyclone of the 2006-2007
  season to reach the intense tropical cyclone threshold of 90 kts.
  The complete report on Dora may be found in the January summary.

     Dora heralded a rather remarkable outbreak of tropical cyclone
  activity in the Southwest Indian basin.  During the month four named
  tropical storms developed with all but one reaching tropical cyclone
  status.  Indeed, Severe Tropical Storm Enok came very close to reaching
  hurricane intensity, and may have actually done so, at least in terms
  of a 1-min avg MSW.   Intense Tropical Cyclone Favio followed a long
  trajectory from west of Diego Garcia southwestward to just south of
  Madagascar, thence curving to the west-northwest and striking the
  nation of Mozambique as an intense tropical cyclone.  The long-lived
  Gamede, also another intense tropical cyclone, moved along a long path
  from well to the southeast of Diego Garcia to a point off the north-
  eastern coast of Madagascar.  From there it made a sharp bend to the 
  south and subsequently tracked southward roughly parallel to the east 
  coast of the big island.  Finally, Tropical Cyclone Humba, which actually
  formed in Perth's AOR, followed a southerly track through the eastern 
  portion of the basin.   Reports on all four named storms follow.



                        SEVERE TROPICAL STORM ENOK
                             (MFR-08 / TC-13S)
                              6 - 11 February
              ----------------------------------------------

  A. General Information
  ----------------------

  1. Identification

     a. RSMC - Meteo France La Reunion (MFR)
     b. MFR  - Tropical Disturbance 08
     c. JTWC - Tropical Cyclone 13S
     d. NAME - Enok (named by Mauritius at Feb 09/1200 UTC; name
               contributed to the regional list by Namibia)

  2. Overview

     a. Basins Affected:  Southwest Indian Ocean (SWI)
     b. Dates:            6 - 11 February, 2007
     c. Max Sust Winds:   60 kts (10-min avg per MFR)
                          55 kts (1-min avg per JTWC) (See Section D)
     d. Min Cent Press:   980 hPa (estimate per MFR)

  3. Beginning of Track:  Feb 06/0000 UTC, near 18.6S/50.9E, or about
     200 nm east of Antananarivo, Madagascar, as referenced in a JTWC
     satellite bulletin.

  4. Peak Intensity: Feb 10/1000 UTC, near 15.8S/58.8E, or about 275 nm
     north-northeast of Mauritius, or very near Ile Saint-Brandon.

  5. Size: At its peak Tropical Storm Enok was a rather compact storm
     with the maximum gale radius being on the order of around 50-70 nm.

  6. End of Track:  Feb 11/1800 UTC, near 23.4S/64.6E, or about 250 nm
     south-southeast of Rodrigues Island.


  B. Synoptic History
  -------------------

  1. Origin:  The earliest known (to the author) reference to the
     pre-Enok system was a satellite bulletin issued by JTWC at 0000 UTC
     on 6 February.  The system must have developed fairly rapidly--at
     06/1000 UTC a TCFA was issued by the same agency as a area of deep
     convection was persisting over a well-defined LLCC in the presence
     of low vertical shear and with excellent equatorward and poleward
     outflow channels being provided by an upper-level anticyclone.

  2. General Description of Track:  System formed just east of northern
     Madagascar, moved northward parallel to coast during its formative
     stages, then began to move east-northeastward and eventually eastward
     as it developed.  After reaching tropical storm status, Enok began to
     accelerate east-southeastward and ultimately south-southeastward as
     it weakened.  Around 0300 UTC 10 February Enok's center passed only
     about 8 nm to the northeast of tiny Saint-Brandon Island, and at
     1800 UTC passed to within 25 nm north-northeast of Rodrigues Island.
     The primary factor contributing to the storm's somewhat unusual track
     was the strong gradient flow between a near-equatorial ridge to the
     northeast and troughing extending northwestward from the remnants of
     Tropical Cyclone Dora to the south.   Enok was already weakening as
     it passed near Rodrigues and subsequently weakened rapidly due to the
     effects of increased vertical shear and advection of dry, stable mid-
     tropospheric air.


  C. Meteorological Data
  ----------------------

     Karl Hoarau has sent me some observations recorded on the small island
  of Saint-Brandon (WMO 61986, 16.5S/59.6E, Elev 3 m above MSL).

     At 10/0100 UTC the station recorded 10-min avg winds of 44 kts with
  a SLP of 988 hPa.  At 0200 UTC the 10-min avg wind was still 44 kts with
  a SLP of 982 hPa.  At the latter hour the center of Enok was located
  about 8 nm northeast of the island.  Between 0200 and 0300 UTC, the SLP
  rose 16 hPa to 998 hPa.   The peak gust recorded on the island (exact
  time unknown) was 87.5 kts.


  D. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     No reports of damage or casualties resulting from Tropical Storm Enok
  have been received.


  E. Additional Discussion
  ------------------------

     According to the track file prepared by the author, based primarily
  upon the warnings received from RSMC La Reunion (MFR), Enok was upgraded
  from a 30-kt tropical depression to a 50-kt severe tropical storm at
  1800 UTC 9 February.  However, the system was actually named by the
  Sub-Regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Centre in Mauritius at 1200 UTC.
  Dvorak classifications from AFWA and JTWC at this time were T3.0/3.0,
  but were still T2.5/2.5 from MFR and SAB.  However, the storm during
  this time was intensifying rather rapidly, and by 1800 UTC MFR's rating
  had jumped to T3.5/3.5.

     Karl Hoarau has also provided an analysis of Enok's intensity.  Karl
  feels that the system had reached tropical storm intensity (1-min avg
  basis) by 09/0600 UTC and hurricane intensity (1-min avg basis) at
  09/2100 UTC.  A microwave image of Enok as early at 09/1611 UTC reveals
  an eye-like feature, and the 87.5-kt gust recorded on the island suggests
  a 1-min avg MSW of 70 kts, or a 10-min avg wind of 62 kts.   In Karl's
  opinion Enok likely reached a peak of 75-kts (1-min avg) around 0300 UTC
  on 10 February before beginning to weaken.

     Following are the MSW (1-min avg) estimates sent by Dr. Hoarau:

  Feb 09-0600 UTC:   35 kts
  Feb 09-0900 UTC:   35 kts
  Feb 09-1200 UTC:   45 kts
  Feb 09-1500 UTC:   50 kts
  Feb 09-1800 UTC:   60 kts
  Feb 09-2100 UTC:   65 kts
  Feb 10-0000 UTC:   70 kts
  Feb 10-0300 UTC:   75 kts
  Feb 10-0600 UTC:   70 kts

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                      INTENSE TROPICAL CYCLONE FAVIO
                             (MFR-09 / TC 14S)
                             12 - 23 February
            --------------------------------------------------

  A. General Information
  ----------------------

  1. Identification

     a. RSMC - Meteo France La Reunion (MFR)
     b. MFR  - Tropical Disturbance 09
     c. JTWC - Tropical Cyclone 14S
     d. NAME - Favio (named by Mauritius at Feb 15/0600 UTC; name
               contributed to the regional list by the Seychelles)

  2. Overview

     a. Basins Affected:  Southwest Indian Ocean (SWI)
     b. Dates:            12 - 23 February, 2007
     c. Max Sust Winds:   100 kts (10-min avg per MFR)
                          125 kts (1-min avg per JTWC)
     d. Min Cent Press:   930 hPa (estimate per MFR)

  3. Beginning of Track:  Feb 12/0000 UTC, near 10.3S/70.0E, or about
     225 nm southwest of Diego Garcia, as referenced in initial bulletin
     issued by MFR.

  4. Peak Intensity:  Feb 21/0000 UTC, near 24.5S/39.9E, or about 400 nm
     southeast of Beira, Mozambique.  (It should be noted that MFR's MSW 
     was at 100 kts from 20/1200 through 21/1200 UTC.)

  5. Size: At its peak Tropical Cyclone Favio was an intense but fairly
     small system with the maximum gale radius being on the order of
     70-90 nm.

  6. End of Track:  Feb 23/1200 UTC, near 19.1S/32.6E, or inland about
     250 km west-northwest of Beira over western Mozambique.


  B. Synoptic History
  -------------------

  1. Origin:  The earliest known (to the author) reference to the pre-Favio
     system was the first bulletin issued by MFR at 0000 UTC 12 February.
     Unfortunately, I do not have available the STWO issued by JTWC for
     that date.  The STWO for 13 February noted that an area of convection
     was located approximately 295 nm south-southwest of Diego Garcia.
     Convection was flaring over a consolidating LLCC in the presence of
     favorable outflow and low vertical shear.   Deep convective bursts
     continued as the environment improved and a TCFA was issued at 2100 
     UTC followed by JTWC's first warning at 1200 UTC 14 February.  
     However, another 18 hours elapsed before the system was named Favio 
     by the Meteorological Services of Mauritius.

  2. General Description of Track:  Favio's track was long and rather
     unusual, being (as far as can be discerned right now), the first
     known tropical cyclone to move westward south of the island of
     Madagascar and strike the African mainland as an intense tropical
     cyclone.  From its origin on the 12th a few hundred miles to the
     southwest of Diego Garcia, Favio moved on a remarkably steady
     southwesterly track which took it less than a hundred miles north
     of Rodrigues Island on the 15th and then a few hundred miles east
     of the Mascarenes on the 16th as it was steered by a large subtropical
     ridge to the southeast.

     The ridge began to build westward, eventually merging with a ridge
     anchored over South Africa.  The tropical storm obligingly turned
     to a westerly track and passed less than a hundred miles south of
     the southern tip of Madagascar on the 19th.  After Favio had entered
     the Mozambique Channel and begun to strengthen, the African ridge
     became the dominant steering mechanism and guided the cyclone on
     a west-northwesterly course which took it inland on the southern
     Mozambique coast on 22 February.


  C. Meteorological Data
  ----------------------

  1. Rodrigues Island:  The center of (then) Tropical Storm Favio passed
     about 80 nm west of the island on 15 February.  Station FIMR/619880
     (19.67S/63.40E, 59.1 m above MSL) reported peak winds of ENE 32 kts,
     gusting to 49 kts at 15/0900 UTC.   A peak gust of 49 kts was also
     reported at 1000 UTC.

  2. The small, tight center of Tropical Cyclone Favio passed about 25 nm
     south of buoy 56511 which reported a SLP of 974 hPa at 20/0100 UTC.
     The buoy was likely on the northern edge of the northern eyewall,
     which, if true, would suggest a CP of around 955 hPa at the time.
     (The estimated MSW at the time was 80 kts.)

  3. Landfall in Mozambique was very close to station FQVL which was
     located in the northern eyewall.  The station ceased reporting after
     the pressure had fallen to 992 hPa, which was about two hours before
     the center made its closest approach.

     The above observations were sent to the author by Derrick Herndon.  A
  special thanks to Derrick for sending the information.


  D. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     Striking Mozambique exactly seven years to the day after Eline, the
  last intense tropical cyclone to strike the country, Favio left a trail
  of destruction and compounded problems for the nation which was still
  suffering the aftermath of flooding during the previous month that had
  left 120,000 homeless.   The cyclone initially struck the Bazaruto
  Islands, noted for resorts.   Favio made landfall near the resort city
  of Vilanculos, destroying thousands of homes and damaging many other
  public buildings, including hospitals, schools and a prison.  Around
  600 prisoners escaped when the jail was destroyed.

     News reports indicate that four persons died in the cyclone with
  scores injured.  Electrical services were disrupted, and many roads
  were blocked by fallen trees, hindering emergency vehicles from easily
  reaching those needing help.  Many fields full of crops such as cassava
  and maize were washed away.  It was feared that the rains attending
  Favio would exacerbate the flooding which had caused much misery in
  the country during the previous weeks.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                      INTENSE TROPICAL CYCLONE GAMEDE
                             (MFR-10 / TC-15S)
                           20 February - 4 March
            ---------------------------------------------------

  A. General Information
  ----------------------

  1. Identification

     a. RSMC - Meteo France La Reunion (MFR)
     b. MFR  - Tropical Disturbance 10
     c. JTWC - Tropical Cyclone 15S
     d. NAME - Gamede (named by Mauritius at Feb 21/0600 UTC; name
               contributed to the regional list by South Africa)

  2. Overview

     a. Basins Affected:  Southwest Indian Ocean (SWI)
     b. Dates:            20 February - 4 March, 2007
     c. Max Sust Winds:   95 kts (10-min avg per MFR)
                          105 kts (1-min avg per JTWC)
     d. Min Cent Press:   935 hPa (estimate per MFR)

  3. Beginning of Track:  Feb 20/1200 UTC, near 14.8S/74.8E, or about
     475 nm south-southeast of Diego Garcia, as referenced in initial
     bulletin issued by MFR.

  4. Peak Intensity:  Feb 25/1800 UTC, near 18.5S/53.9E, or about 225 nm
     west-northwest of Mauritius.  (It should be noted that MFR's MSW
     was at 95 kts from 25/1800 through 26/1200 UTC.)

  5. Size:  At its peak Tropical Cyclone Gamede was a rather large tropical
     cyclone with gales extending outward 150 nm from the center in all
     directions and up to 250 nm in the southern semicircle.

  6. End of Track:  Mar 04/1200 UTC, near 32.4S/49.7E, or about 750 nm
     south-southwest of Reunion Island.


  B. Synoptic History
  -------------------

  1. Origin:  Gamede's origin seems to lie in an area of convection which
     developed on 19 February about 610 nm southeast of Diego Garcia.  A
     weak but well-defined LLCC was in evidence with some associated
     convective banding north of the center and some deep convection
     flaring over the center.  By the 20th the system was situated beneath
     an upper-level anticyclone which was providing low vertical shear and
     favorable eastward and equatorward outflow.  MFR initiated warnings
     on the system and JTWC upped the development potential to 'fair'.
     Convective organization continued to improve and JTWC issued a TCFA
     at 20/2000 UTC, followed by the first warning at 21/0600 UTC.  At
     the same time, Mauritius and MFR upgraded the system to tropical storm
     status with Mauritius assigning the name Gamede.

  2. General Description of Track:  During its early stages Gamede moved
     initially westward, then west-southwestward as it was steered by a
     strong mid-level subtropical ridge to the south.  The cyclone had
     become quasi-stationary by late on the 25th due to the competing
     steering influences of the subtropical ridge anchored south of
     Madagascar and a near-equatorial ridge to the east-northeast of the
     storm.  Gamede was at its peak intensity at this time, but began
     to slowly weaken, in part due to a decrease in local SSTs brought
     about by upwelling while the cyclone was essentially stationary.
     By early on the 27th Gamede had embarked on a south-southwesterly
     track as the near-equatorial ridge built southward and a mid-latitude
     trough induced a weakness in the subtropical ridge.

     The motion toward the south-southwest, roughly parallel to and about
     200 nm east of the coastline of Madagascar, continued as Gamede
     continued to slowly weaken.  Shear began to increase on 1 March as
     the system encountered stronger mid-latitude flow, and Gamede was
     classified as an extratropical cyclone at 1200 UTC on 2 March.  As
     Gamede underwent extratropical transition, a subtropical ridge began
     to build eastward from South Africa, causing the southerly motion
     to slow and eventually come to a halt.  MFR issued their final warning
     at 04/1200 UTC with the gale quasi-stationary about 750 nm to the
     south-southwest of Reunion Island.


  C. Meteorological Data
  ----------------------

  1. According to some information received from Derrick Herndon, Gamede
     passed 50 nm north of buoy 14926 around 1200 UTC on 22 February.
     The buoy reported a SLP of 985 hPa from a position estimated to be
     a little south of the southern eyewall.  This would suggest a CP of
     around 970 hPa.  Environmental pressures in the area were running
     around 1008 hPa, resulting in a delta of 38 hPa--in good agreement
     with latest AMSU estimates.

  2. The eye of Gamede passed over Saint-Brandon Island around 1100 UTC
     on 23 February with a minimum SLP of 960 hPa being recorded.

  3. Philippe Caroff, Chief Forecaster at RSMC La Reunion, sent some data
     describing record rainfall produced on the island by Gamede.  The
     cyclone's center never approached closer than 125 nm to the island,
     but remained within 215 nm of Reunion for more than 90 hours.  The
     large extension of Gamede induced persistent heavy rainfall in the
     mountains on the island.  While peak rainfall intensities were never
     extreme, accumulated totals were very impressive, exceeding 2500 mm
     in four days.

     Some world records fell.  The 72-hour record rainfall of 3240 mm
     established in January, 1980, during Tropical Cyclone Hyacinthe
     was beaten twice with 3929 mm at Commerson's Crater (2286 metres
     elevation) and with 3264 mm recorded at Hell Bourg (a village at
     914 metres).

     Other records for periods ranging up to 9 days were also beaten by
     Commerson's Crater values:

     4 days - 4869 mm
     5 days - 4979 mm
     6 days - 5075 mm
     7 days - 5400 mm
     8 days - 5510 mm
     9 days - 5512 mm

     In addition, the previous 4-day rainfall record at Hell Bourg of
     3551 mm was eclipsed by a 96-hour total of 3633 mm associated with
     Tropical Cyclone Gamede.


  D. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     The heavy rains on Reunion Island led to some flood damage with one
  woman being reported missing after her car was swept away by flood
  waters.  A bridge collapsed near the southern town of Saint-Louis with
  the cost estimated at 20 million euros (US$26.32 million).

     No other reports of damage or casualties associated with Intense
  Tropical Cyclone Gamede have been received.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)



                         TROPICAL CYCLONE HUMBA
                            (MFR-11 / TC-16S)
                            20 - 28 February
               ------------------------------------------

  A. General Information
  ----------------------

  1. Identification

     a. RSMC - BoM Perth/Meteo France La Reunion (MFR)
     b. MFR  - Tropical Disturbance 11 (West of 90E)
     c. JTWC - Tropical Cyclone 16S
     d. NAME - Humba (named by Mauritius at Feb 23/0600 UTC; name
               contributed to the regional list by Tanzania)

  2. Overview

     a. Basins Affected:  Northwest Australia/Southeast Indian Ocean (AUW)
                          Southwest Indian Ocean (SWI)
     b. Dates:            20 - 28 February, 2007
     c. Max Sust Winds:   75 kts (10-min avg per MFR)
                          70 kts (1-min avg per JTWC)
     d. Min Cent Press:   960 hPa (estimate per MFR)

  3. Beginning of Track:  Feb 20/2100 UTC, near 10.0S/92.0E, or about
     350 nm west-northwest of the Cocos Islands, as referenced in initial
     gale warning issued by BoM Perth.

  4. Peak Intensity:  Feb 25/0600 UTC, near 19.6S/79.0E, or about 800 nm
     south-southeast of Diego Garcia.  (It should be noted that MFR's
     MSW was at 75 kts from 25/0600 through 25/1800 UTC.)

  5. Size:  Based on MFR's warnings, at its peak Tropical Cyclone Humba
     was a somewhat compact system with a gale radius of 60 nm.  However,
     JTWC's warnings described a somewhat larger cyclone with gale radii
     in the various quadrants averaging slightly over 100 nm.

  6. End of Track:  Feb 28/1200 UTC, near 29.8S/78.3E, or about 1400 nm
     south-southeast of Diego Garcia.


  B. Synoptic History
  -------------------

  1. Origin:  The daily Tropical Cyclone Outlook issued by BoM Perth on
     19 February mentioned a tropical LOW which was located about 170 nm
     northwest of the Cocos Islands.  The development potential was rated
     'high' over the next couple of days.  A STWO issued by JTWC on the
     20th noted that deep convection was flaring along a convergent band
     on the southwestern periphery of a well-defined, though broad, LLCC.
     Vertical shear in the region was low and an anticyclone aloft was
     providing good outflow.   The Perth TCWC began issuing gale warnings
     at 20/2100 UTC in anticipation of the system strengthening further.
     JTWC issued a TCFA at 21/0930 UTC due to the development of deep
     convection near a well-defined LLCC.  Outflow remained excellent
     and shear was forecast to decrease as the disturbance continued
     moving southward under a ridge axis.

     At 21/1200 UTC JTWC issued the first warning on TC-16S, assessing
     the MSW at 35 kts (1-min avg).  At the same time the system crossed
     longitude 90E and official warning responsibility was passed from
     BoM Perth to RSMC La Reunion.   Perth had been assessing the intensity
     at 30 kts (10-min avg), but MFR lowered this to 25 kts in their
     warnings, except for the possibility of 30 kts locally in the southern
     semicircle.  The MSW was upped to 30 kts at 22/0600 UTC, and at
     23/0600 UTC the depression was officially upgraded to Tropical Storm
     Humba, the name being assigned by the Meteorological Services of
     Mauritius.

  2. General Description of Track:  Tropical Cyclone Humba for the most
     part followed a rather smooth trajectory curving around the north-
     western and later western periphery of a subtropical ridge anchored
     over Western Australia.  The storm was moving west-southwesterly on
     the 21st as it entered the Southwest Indian Ocean basin, but the
     motion became more toward the southwest on the 23rd, and by the time
     of Humba's peak intensity on 25 February the cyclone was moving in
     a south-southwesterly direction.   Shortly after peaking in intensity
     an upper-level trough began to overtake the system from the west,
     increasing vertical shear and decreasing outflow aloft.  The storm
     began to steadily weaken and was declared extratropical at 0600 UTC
     on 27 February.  By the 28th the extratropical gale had slowed and
     turned westward just north of latitude 30S due to a blocking HIGH
     to the south, and MFR issued its final warning on the system at
     1200 UTC.


  C. Meteorological Data
  ----------------------

     No meteorological observations have been received by the author in
  association with Tropical Cyclone Humba.


  D. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     No reports of damage or casualties resulting from Tropical Cyclone
  Humba have been received.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHWEST AUSTRALIA/SOUTHEAST INDIAN OCEAN (AUW) - From 90E to 135E

  Activity for February:  2 tropical LOWs **

  ** - one system eventually became a tropical cyclone in the Southwest
       Indian Ocean


                Northwest Australia/Southeast Indian Ocean
                      Tropical Activity for February
                ------------------------------------------

     No tropical cyclones traversed waters between 90E and 135E during the
  month of February.  A tropical LOW formed on 3 February about 310 nm
  north of the Cocos Islands.  The system was referenced in the daily
  Tropical Cyclone Outlooks for the Central Indian Ocean issued by the
  Perth TCWC from the 3rd through the 7th.  The LOW meandered about in the
  same general area for several days but never developed to the point that
  gale warnings were required.   The potential for development was rated
  'high' on the 4th and 5th, but this had decreased by the 6th.  No track
  was included for this system in the companion cyclone tracks file.

     Another tropical LOW developed well west of the Cocos Islands on the
  20th with gale warnings being initiated.  This LOW subsequently moved
  west of 90E where it developed into Tropical Storm Humba on 23 February.
  The report on Tropical Cyclone Humba may be found in the preceding
  section of this summary covering the Southwest Indian Ocean.

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHEAST AUSTRALIA/CORAL SEA (AUE) - From 135E to 160E

  Activity for February:  1 tropical cyclone of storm intensity
                          1 monsoon LOW of gale intensity


                          Sources of Information
                          ----------------------

     The primary sources of tracking and intensity information for
  Northeast Australia/Coral Sea tropical cyclones are the warnings
  and advices issued by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres at
  Brisbane, Queensland, and Darwin, Northern Territory, and on very
  infrequent occasions, by the centre at Port Moresby, Papua New
  Guinea.  References to sustained winds imply a 10-minute averaging
  period unless otherwise stated.

     In the companion tropical cyclone tracks file, I occasionally
  annotate positions from warnings issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning
  Center (JTWC) of the U. S. Air Force and Navy, located at Pearl
  Harbor, Hawaii, when they differ from the Australian centres' coor-
  dinates by usually 40-50 nm or more.  The JTWC warnings are also the
  source of the 1-minute average maximum sustained wind values included
  in the tracks file.   Additionally, information describing details of
  satellite imagery and atmospheric circulation features included in
  the narratives is often gleaned from the JTWC warnings.


                       Northeast Australia/Coral Sea
                       Tropical Activity for February
                       ------------------------------

     A tropical LOW formed near the Top End of the Northern Territory at
  the end of January and spent several days zigzagging around the Gulf of
  Carpentaria.  Finally, almost a week after its genesis, the LOW was able
  to strengthen into a tropical cyclone in the southeastern Gulf and was
  named Nelson.  Nelson intensified quickly and became a Category 2 cyclone
  on the Australian Scale shortly before landfall at the base of the Cape
  York Peninsula.  A report on Tropical Cyclone Nelson, authored by Simon
  Clarke, follows.

     The Brisbane TCWC issued gale warnings from 5 to 8 February on a
  monsoon LOW which formed east of Cairns on the 5th and subsequently
  moved southeastward parallel to the Queensland coastline.  The LOW
  weakened early on the 6th, but reformed to the west early on the 7th
  less than 100 nm east of Cairns.  This LOW helped to draw away most
  of the moisture feeding into the weakening overland Nelson and led to
  that system's quick decay following landfall.   Gales of up to 40 kts
  were forecast in association with the monsoon LOW, but the system did 
  not have the structure of a tropical cyclone; hence, no name was 
  assigned.  A track was included for this system in the companion cyclone
  tracks file and a track graphic can be found on John Diebolt's website.



                         TROPICAL CYCLONE NELSON 
                                (TC-12P)
                         31 January - 7 February
               -------------------------------------------

  A. Storm Origins
  ----------------

     The tropical LOW that was to eventually become Tropical Cyclone 
  Nelson developed to the north of Melville Island, Northern Territory, 
  as early as 30 January.   The LOW formed at the western end of a 
  re-invigorated monsoon trough, which linked to another developing 
  tropical LOW in the far northwestern Coral Sea.  This other tropical 
  LOW moved overland into the Palmerville-Georgetown region of 
  Queensland over the next few days and was responsible for directing a 
  significant moisture-laden air mass onto Queensland’s tropical east 
  coast that produced torrential rains and flooding for several days 
  between Innisfail and Sarina.  The BoM reported that several records 
  were broken.  Warden Bend recorded a new extreme daily total of 
  268.6 mm, while Hecate with 349.2 mm and Roma Peak with 222.8 mm 
  recorded their highest February daily rainfalls on record.

     The pre-Nelson tropical Low moved to the east, skirting the 
  northern Top End coast of the Territory at 10 kts.  The surface 
  circulation could be clearly seen in radar imagery as it passed close 
  to Cape Wessel, Northern Territory, late on 31 January.  However, 
  continued development was held back by significant (20-kt plus) 
  upper-level easterly wind shear emanating from the Georgetown LOW’s 
  circulation.  Upper-level wind shear continued to hinder the further 
  development of the LOW as it tracked into the central Gulf of 
  Carpentaria before pushing back to the SW under the influence of a 
  strengthening subtropical ridge to the south and east.  For much of the 
  time the LLCC was located on the extreme eastern edge of the 
  convection and possibly broke in two at one point, reconsolidating 
  farther to the west as its deep cloud sheared off to the east and 
  south.  By 4 February, the LOW was located close to the Northern 
  Territory coast near Vanderlin Island, approximately 50 nm ENE of 
  Borroloola, Northern Territory, (15.7S/137.1E) where it hovered for 
  approximately 18 hrs. 

     By this time upper-level conditions became more conducive for 
  development as a ridge relocated itself over the system, resulting in 
  improved upper-level outflow which allowed a CDO to develop over the 
  LLCC.  The tropical LOW commenced a northeasterly path into the more 
  open water of the southern Gulf of Carpentaria and gradually 
  intensified.  By 04/2100 UTC the tropical LOW had drifted back to the 
  SE as the monsoon flow over the Arafura Sea strengthened.  The 
  developing LOW moved back into the Queensland AOR and was named 
  Nelson near 15.8S/139.0E (approximately 45 nm NNW of Mornington 
  Island, Queensland) at 2100 UTC 5 February.


  B. Synoptic History
  -------------------

     The balance of Nelson’s synoptic history proved to be rather 
  straightforward as the cyclone moved to the E to ESE at 12 kts, 
  passing to the north of Mornington Island while slowly building into 
  a Category 2 cyclone.  However, just prior to landfall, which 
  occurred at 06/1800 UTC just south of the mouth of the Gilbert River 
  (approximately 16.5S/141.3E, or 65 nm NNE of Karumba), a small 
  clockwise loop was observed.  Peak intensity of 980 hPa with 55-kt 
  max 10-min avg winds was achieved at landfall.  Although the cyclone 
  was initially predicted to track rapidly across northern Queensland 
  and redevelop in the Coral Sea, a new tropical Low developed just to 
  the east of Cairns, drawing away most of the moisture input into 
  Nelson.  The cyclone decayed quickly, losing cyclone status at 
  07/0300 UTC (near 16.4S/142.3E, or 105 nm NE of Karumba).  Ex-Nelson 
  dissipated soon thereafter over the southwestern Cape York Peninsula 
  as the new LOW off the tropical northeastern coast of Queensland 
  gradually accelerated away to the southeast.

 
  C. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------

     There were no casualties reported from Nelson.  However, all ten 
  crew members aboard a 5,000-tonne barge (MV Wunma) were winched to 
  safety to a bulk carrier after the zinc-carrying vessel was swamped 
  by huge seas whipped up by the cyclone while about 50 nm NW of 
  Karumba.  The cyclone also whipped up large waves along the entire 
  western seaboard of the Gulf.  At Weipa, well to the north of the 
  cyclone, waves were reported reaching as high as five metres. 

     Despite this, little overall damage was reported.  No one was 
  reported as injured and there was no major flooding in local rivers. 
  Bitumen roads remained open.  At Inkerman Station, which reported the 
  eye of the cyclone, a few palm trees were blown down and a tank blew 
  off a water stand.  

     An ABC TV-provided newsreel may be viewed at the following link:

  http://origin.abc.net.au/news/items/200702/1842591.htm?queensland>

  (Report written by Simon Clarke)

  *************************************************************************

  SOUTH PACIFIC (SPA) - South Pacific Ocean East of Longitude 160E

  Activity for February:  1 tropical depression **

  ** - system was treated as a minimal tropical storm by JTWC


                          Sources of Information
                          ----------------------

     The primary sources of tracking and intensity information for
  South Pacific tropical cyclones are the warnings and advisories
  issued by the Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres at Nadi, Fiji (for
  waters north of latitude 25S), and Wellington, New Zealand (for
  waters south of latitude 25S).  References to sustained winds imply
  a 10-minute averaging period unless otherwise stated.

     In the companion tropical cyclone tracks file, I occasionally
  annotate positions from warnings issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning
  Center (JTWC) of the U. S. Air Force and Navy, located at Pearl
  Harbor, Hawaii, when they differ from the Southern Hemisphere
  centres' coordinates by usually 40-50 nm or more.  The JTWC warnings
  are also the source of the 1-minute average maximum sustained wind
  values included in the tracks file.    Additionally, information
  describing details of satellite imagery and atmospheric circulation
  features included in the narratives is often gleaned from the JTWC
  warnings.


                South Pacific Tropical Activity for February
                --------------------------------------------

     Tropical cyclone activity to date for the current season in the South
  Pacific Ocean has occurred in two well-defined periods.  The first began
  with the development of intense Tropical Cyclone Xavier in late October
  and concluded with Tropical Depression 05F in late November/early
  December, which was treated as a minimal tropical storm (TC-04P) by
  JTWC.  The basin lay quiet until another round of activity began during
  the second week of January, beginning with Tropical Depression 06F and
  including the short-lived Tropical Cyclones Zita and Arthur.  This second
  spurt of activity concluded with a system which began forming late in
  January and was classified as Tropical Depression 09F by RSMC Nadi on
  2 February.  JTWC assessed this system to be a minimal tropical storm
  and numbered it TC-11P.  A short report on TD-09F/TC-11P follows.
  Following the demise of this system on 5 February, no tropical
  depressions were classified until 21 March.



                            TROPICAL DEPRESSION
                             (TD-09F / TC-11P)
                               1 - 5 February
                  ---------------------------------------

     A short report is being included for this system due to the fact that
  JTWC briefly upgraded it to tropical storm intensity (1-min avg MSW of
  35 kts).   The Tropical Disturbance Summary issued by RSMC Nadi at 2100
  UTC on 29 January mentioned a tropical disturbance near 10.0S/174.0W,
  or west-northwest of Samoa.  The system was poorly-organized with most
  of the convection located to the north and east of the LLCC.  The
  disturbance was moving westward in an environment of weak vertical shear.
  By 2100 UTC on 31 January the system had crossed the Dateline, still
  moving slowly westward.  Overall environmental conditions were favorable
  for tropical cyclogenesis, but there had been no westerly surge to aid
  in development; hence, none of the models at the time were suggesting
  intensification.

     The Fiji TCWC assigned the number '09F' to the disturbance at 2100
  UTC on 1 February with the center located roughly 500 nm north of the
  Fijian island of Suva.  Convective banding was increasing in organization
  with the LLCC located near a band of deep convection.  By 0600 UTC on
  the 2nd Nadi had classified the system as Tropical Depression 09F.  The
  depression's motion had been erratic but was generally toward the south-
  west.  At 03/0000 UTC the center of TD-09F was estimated to be about
  385 nm northwest of Suva with maximum 10-min avg winds of 30 kts.  The
  forecast called for the depression to eventually turn and accelerate
  toward the southeast.  Also, early on the 3rd JTWC issued a TCFA for
  the system, which was showing signs of increased convective organization
  within a favorable environment of low vertical shear and anticyclonic
  outflow aloft.

     JTWC issued the first of three warnings on TC-11P at 0000 UTC on
  4 February, estimating the MSW at 35 kts (1-min avg).  The system was
  tracking southeastward at 10 kts along the southwestern periphery of
  a near-equatorial ridge to the east.  The warning from Nadi at this
  time placed it about 110 nm north-northeast of Suva and about to cross
  the island of Nambouwalu.  However, the concurrent JTWC position was
  105 nm to the northwest of the position reported by Nadi.  While outflow
  was favorable, vertical shear continued to increase along the track of
  the depression, and this prevented any further intensification.   After
  leaving the Fiji area, TD-09F/TC-11P accelerated to the southeast, and
  at 05/0000 UTC was located only about 50 nm south-southeast of
  Nuku'alofa in Tonga.   Again, this is based on Nadi's coordinates--JTWC's
  final warning placed the center about 90 nm to the north-northeast.
  This was also Fiji's final warning on the system as the LLCC had become
  exposed and devoid of deep convection.  The deepest convection was
  displaced about 60 nm to the east of the center and shear was increasing.
  The remnant LOW turned to the east and had become very ill-defined about
  200 nm south-southeast of Niue by 05/1200 UTC.

     Dvorak ratings from JTWC, SAB and AFWA peaked at T2.5/2.5, and were
  in agreement with RSMC Nadi's analyses.  Interestingly, the Brisbane
  TCWC rated the depression at T3.0/3.0 at 04/0520 UTC, and CPHC got as
  high as T3.5/3.5 at 04/0438 UTC.  Such differences illustrate the
  uncertainties and subjectivity inherent in the Dvorak technique, useful
  though it may be, and make a good case for the wisdom of taking into
  consideration all the available estimates when attempting to determine
  the best value for the operational intensity to include in warnings.

     No reports of damage or casualties resulting from this system have
  been received.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)

  *************************************************************************

         SPECIAL FEATURE - SOURCES OF TROPICAL CYCLONE INFORMATION

     The purpose of this section is to list some websites where many and
  varied types of tropical cyclone information are archived.  Many readers
  will know about these already, but for the benefit of those who don't,
  I wanted to include them. 

  (1) Aircraft Reconnaissance Information
  ---------------------------------------

     Various types of messages from reconnaissance aircraft may be
  retrieved from the following FTP site:

     ftp://ftp.nhc.noaa.gov/pub/products/nhc/recon/>

     Information regarding how to interpret the coded reconnaissance
  messages may be found at the following URL:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/reconlist.shtml>

  Links are also included to websites with further information about the
  U. S. Air Force 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron and the NOAA Air-
  craft Operations Center.

  (2) Archived Advisories
  -----------------------

     All the advisory products (public advisories, forecast/advisories,
  strike probabilities, discussions, various graphics) issued by TPC/NHC
  are archived on TPC's website.  For the current year (using 2004 as an
  example), the archived products can be found at:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2004/index.shtml>

  Links to tropical products archives for earlier years are available at
  the following URL:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastall.shtml>

  JTWC warnings for past storms are archived on the NRL Monterrey website:

     http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html>

  On the NRL site, the link to past years can be found in the upper left 
  corner of the screen.

     I am not aware at the moment of any other TCWC which archives all
  its tropical cyclone warning/advisory products for public access, but
  if I learn of any, I will add them to this list.

  (3) Satellite Imagery
  ---------------------

     Satellite images of tropical cyclones in various sensor bands are
  available on the NRL Monterrey and University of Wisconsin websites,
  courtesy of Jeff Hawkins and Chris Velden and their associates.  The
  links are:

     http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html>

     http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/tropic/tropic.html>

  On the NRL site, the link to past years can be found in the upper left 
  corner of the screen.  For the CIMSS site, a link to data archives is 
  located in the lower left portion of the screen.

     Additional tropical satellite imagery, along with looping ability for
  composite microwave imagery for the Western Hemisphere north of the
  equator, can be found at:

  (1) For the Eastern North Pacific:

     http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/trop-epac.html>

  (2) For the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea:

     http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/trop-atl.html>

     I'm sure there are other sites with available imagery available, and
  as I learn of them, I will add the links to this list.

  *************************************************************************

                               EXTRA FEATURE

     In order to shorten the amount of typing in preparing the narrative
  material, I have been in the habit of freely using abbreviations and
  acronyms.   I have tried to define most of these with the first usage
  in a given summary, but I may have missed one now and then.  Most of
  these are probably understood by a majority of readers but perhaps a
  few aren't clear to some.  To remedy this I developed a Glossary of
  Abbreviations and Acronyms which I first included in the August, 1998
  summary.  I don't normally include the Glossary in most months in
  order to help keep them from being too long.  If anyone would like to
  receive a copy of the Glossary, please e-mail me and I'll be happy
  to send them a copy.

  *************************************************************************

  AUTHOR'S NOTE:  This summary should be considered a very preliminary 
  overview of the tropical cyclones that occur in each month. The cyclone
  tracks (provided separately) will generally be based upon operational
  warnings issued by the various tropical cyclone warning centers.  The
  information contained therein may differ somewhat from the tracking and
  intensity information obtained from a "best-track" file which is based
  on a detailed post-seasonal analysis of all available data. Information
  on where to find official "best-track" files from the various warning
  centers will be passed along from time to time.

    The track files are not being sent via e-mail.  They can be retrieved
  from the archive sites listed below.  (Note: I do have a limited e-mail
  distribution list for the track files.    If anyone wishes to receive
  these via e-mail, please send me a message.)

    Both the summaries and the track files are standard text files
  created in DOS editor.  Download to disk and use a viewer such as
  Notepad or DOS editor to view the files.

     The first summary in this series covered the month of October,
  1997.   Back issues can be obtained from the following websites
  (courtesy of Michael Bath, Michael V. Padua, Michael Pitt, Chris
  Landsea, and John Diebolt):

    http://australiasevereweather.com/cyclones/>
    http://www.typhoon2000.ph>
    http://mpittweather.com>
    ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/pub/landsea/padgett/>
    http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/>


     Another website where much information about tropical cyclones may
  be found is the website for the UK Meteorological Office.  Their site
  contains a lot of statistical information about tropical cyclones
  globally on a monthly basis.  The URL is:

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/tropicalcyclone>
    

                    TROPICAL CYCLONE REPORTS AVAILABLE

     JTWC now has available on its website the Annual Tropical Cyclone
  Report (ATCR) for 2005 (2004-2005 season for the Southern Hemisphere).
  ATCRs for earlier years are available also.

     The URL is:  https://metocph.nmci.navy.mil/jtwc.php>


     Also, TPC/NHC has available on its webpage nice "technicolor"
  tracking charts for the 2006 Atlantic and Eastern North Pacific
  tropical cyclones; also, storm reports for all the 2006 Atlantic
  and Eastern North Pacific cyclones are now available, as well as
  track charts and reports on storms from earlier years. 

     The URL is:  http://www.nhc.noaa.gov>


     A special thanks to Michael Bath of McLeans Ridges, New South Wales,
  Australia, for assisting me with proofreading the summaries.


  PREPARED BY

  Gary Padgett
  E-mail:  [email protected]
  Phone:  334-222-5327

  Kevin Boyle  (Northwest Pacific)
  E-mail:  [email protected]

  Simon Clarke  (Northeast Australia/Coral Sea, South Pacific)
  E-mail:  [email protected]

  *************************************************************************
  *************************************************************************

Document: summ0702.htm
Updated: 28th March 2007

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