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Monthly Global Tropical Cyclone Summary June 2006
[Summaries and Track Data] [Prepared by Gary Padgett]

                  MONTHLY GLOBAL TROPICAL CYCLONE SUMMARY

                                JUNE, 2006
                                

  (For general comments about the nature of these summaries, as well as
  information on how to download the tabular cyclone track files, see
  the Author's Note at the end of this summary.)

  *************************************************************************

                              JUNE HIGHLIGHTS

   --> First Atlantic tropical storm of season crosses Florida Peninsula
   --> Minor tropical storm traverses South China Sea

  *************************************************************************
  
              !!!!!!!!!!!!!!    EXTRA FEATURE    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

              A REVIEW OF THE 2005-2006 TROPICAL CYCLONE SEASON

                         FOR THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE

     Following is a tabular summary of all the tropical depressions
  and tropical cyclones which occurred in the Southern Hemisphere
  between 1 July 2005 and 30 June 2006 as reported in the Monthly
  Global Tropical Cyclone Summaries prepared by the author.

    (1) Number - this is the sequential cyclone number assigned by JTWC
        in Hawaii.

    (2) Name - the name (if any) assigned by the responsible Tropical
        Cyclone Warning Centre.  For systems in the South Indian Ocean
        west of 90E and in the Southwest Pacific east of 160E which were
        unnamed, the alphanumeric designator applied by La Reunion or
        Fiji, respectively, is given in this column.

    (3) Dates - range of dates for which tracking information for the 
        cyclone is available in the Global Tropical Cyclone Tracks files
        prepared by the author.  The dates given in most cases refer to
        the time the system was in warning status and generally do not
        include the pre-depression stages of the disturbance.

    (4) Pressure - Lowest central pressure (either estimated or recorded)
        during the lifetime of the cyclone.  An asterisk (*) following
        the pressure indicates the reading was an actual measured
        pressure.   Central pressure is given in millibars, which is
        numerically equivalent to hectopascals.

    (5) MSW 1-min avg - maximum 1-minute average sustained windspeed in 
        knots as assigned by JTWC.  An asterisk (*) following the MSW
        indicates that it was an actual measured value.

    (6) MSW 10-min avg - maximum 10-minute average sustained windspeed
        in knots as assigned by the responsible Tropical Cyclone Warning
        Centre.  An asterisk (*) following the MSW indicates that it was
        an actual measured value.

    (7) Basins - tropical cyclone basins where the cyclone tracked during
        its life:

        SWI - Southwest Indian Ocean - West of 90E
        AUW - Northwest Australia/Southeast Indian Ocean - 90E to 135E
        AUE - Northeast Australia/Coral Sea - 135E to 160E
        SPA - South Pacific Ocean - East of 160E
        SAT - South Atlantic Ocean

     A number in parentheses (e.g. (1) ) following an entry refers to
  a note following the entries for the given basin.   A separate table
  is given for each of the four Southern Hemisphere basins.

     Abbreviations for Tropical Cyclone Warning Centres:

  JTWC -    Joint Typhoon Warning Center, formerly on Guam, now at
            Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
  MFR -     Meteo France Reunion (RSMC La Reunion)
  RSMC -    Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre

  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                          SOUTHWEST INDIAN OCEAN

  JTWC    NAME                DATES          CENT    MSW   MSW    BASIN
  NUM                                        PRS   1-MIN 10-MIN
                                             (mb)   (kts) (kts)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------

  ---  (MFR-01)              05-06 Sep       1001     --    25    SWI
  01S  (MFR-02)              12-15 Oct        997     35    30    SWI
  ---  (MFR-03)              06-08 Nov        998     --    30    SWI
  ---  (MFR-07)              03-07 Jan       1000     --    25    SWI
  09S  Boloetse              24 Jan-06 Feb    946    100    90    SWI
  12S  (MFR-09)              19-21 Feb        995     45    40    SWI
  14S  Carina                23 Feb-03 Mar    910    130   115    SWI
  16S  Diwa                  02-10 Mar        980     55    60    SWI
  ---  (MFR-12)              04 Mar          1000     --    25    SWI
  22S  Elia                  06-16 Apr        987     55    45    SWI/AUW

  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 
                NORTHWEST AUSTRALIA / SOUTHEAST INDIAN OCEAN   

  JTWC    NAME                DATES          CENT    MSW   MSW    BASIN
  NUM                                        PRS   1-MIN 10-MIN
                                             (mb)   (kts) (kts)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------

  02S  (MFR-04)              05-08 Nov        995     45    30     AUW/SWI
  03S  Bertie-Alvin          18-28 Nov        930    115   100     AUW/SWI
  04S  (MFR-06)              21-29 Dec        998     35    30     AUW/SWI
  05S  Clare                 07-10 Jan        960     60    75     AUW
  08S  Daryl                 17-23 Jan        965     65    65     AUW
  15S  Emma                  26-28 Feb        986     35    40     AUW
  ---  -----                 28 Feb-07 Mar    998     --    30     AUW
  19S  Floyd                 19-27 Mar        915    115   105     AUW
  20S  Glenda                23-31 Mar        910    140   115     AUW
  ---  -----                 26-27 Mar        996     --    30     AUW
  21S  Hubert                04-07 Apr        970     55    55     AUW

  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


                      NORTHEAST AUSTRALIA / CORAL SEA

  JTWC    NAME                DATES          CENT    MSW   MSW    BASIN
  NUM                                        PRS   1-MIN 10-MIN
                                             (mb)   (kts) (kts)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------

  10P  Jim                   26 Jan-02 Feb    955     80    80     AUE/SPA
  13P  Kate                  22-24 Feb        985     50    50     AUE
  ---  -----                 01-06 Mar        995     --    55     AUE (1)
  17P  Larry                 16-21 Mar        915    100   110     AUE
  23P  Monica                16-26 Apr        905    155   135     AUE/AUW

  NOTES:

  (1) System was a hybrid, subtropical LOW.

  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


                            SOUTH PACIFIC OCEAN

  JTWC    NAME                DATES          CENT    MSW   MSW    BASIN
  NUM                                        PRS   1-MIN 10-MIN
                                             (mb)   (kts) (kts)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------

  06P  Tam                   06-15 Jan       987      40    45     SPA
  ---  (05F)                 10-13 Jan       996      --    30     SPA
  07P  Urmil                 13-15 Jan       975      60    60     SPA
  ---  (10F)                 02-04 Feb       998      --    30     SPA (1)
  ---  (11F)                 08-10 Feb      1000      --    30     SPA
  11P  Vaianu                09-19 Feb       965      75    70     SPA
  ---  (13F)                 19-25 Feb       998      --    25     SPA (1)
  18P  Wati                  17-28 Mar       950      80    85     SPA/AUE

  NOTES:

  (1) Some peripheral gales were associated with these systems.

  ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


                            SOUTH ATLANTIC OCEAN

  JTWC    NAME                DATES          CENT    MSW   MSW    BASIN
  NUM                                        PRS   1-MIN 10-MIN
                                             (mb)   (kts) (kts)
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------

  ---  -----                 21-23 Feb       ---      55    --     SAT (1)

  NOTES:

  (1) The tracking and intensity information for this South Atlantic
      tropical storm was supplied by Dr. Karl Hoarau of Cergy-Pontoise
      University, Paris, France.

 ************************************************************************
  
                            ACTIVITY BY BASINS

  ATLANTIC (ATL) - North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico

  Activity for June:  1 tropical storm


                         Sources of Information
                         ----------------------

     Most of the information presented below was obtained from the
  various tropical cyclone products issued by the Tropical Prediction
  Center/National Hurricane Center (TPC/NHC) in Miami, Florida:
  discussions, public advisories, forecast/advisories, tropical weather
  outlooks, special tropical disturbance statements, etc.    Some
  additional information may have been gleaned from the monthly
  summaries prepared by the hurricane specialists and available on
  TPC/NHC's website.     All references to sustained winds imply a
  1-minute averaging period unless otherwise noted.


                    Atlantic Tropical Activity for June
                    -----------------------------------

     Since 1950 the month of June in the Atlantic basin has averaged a
  tropical storm roughly every other year with an average of 1.38 NSD.  
  June of 2006 was the second consecutive month of June to produce a 
  tropical storm, following the two named storms which kicked off the 
  incredibly active 2005 season.  However, neither of the 2005 or 2006 
  storms reached hurricane intensity.  On the average a June hurricane 
  forms about every six years, but the last June hurricane was Hurricane 
  Allison in 1995, and the previous June hurricane prior to that was 
  Hurricane Bonnie in 1986.  Between 1954 and 1972, inclusive, seven 
  hurricanes formed in the month of June, plus one in May (1970).  This 
  year's Tropical Storm Alberto, as did Arlene last year, neared hurricane
  intensity but fell a little short of being upgraded.  Alberto lasted 
  longer than the average June tropical storm, producing 3.00 NSD.  A 
  short report on Alberto follows.



                           TROPICAL STORM ALBERTO
                                   (TC-01)
                                10 - 18 June
                 ------------------------------------------

     Much of the information following was obtained from the monthly
  summary for June prepared by the hurricane specialists at TPC/NHC.
  Alberto formed from the interaction of a tropical wave with a trough
  of low pressure which lay over the northwestern Caribbean Sea in early
  June.  A tropical depression formed on 10 June and the poorly-organized
  center moved northwestward through the Yucatan Channel that night.
  Around 1300 UTC on the morning of 11 June a reconnaissance plane measured
  a FLW of 51 kts at 425 metres.  This data, along with a ship report of
  33 kts at 1200 UTC in the same area, was the basis for upgrading Alberto
  to a tropical storm at 1500 UTC.  The center of the newly-christened
  cyclone with 40-kt winds was then located about 175 nm northwest of the
  western tip of Cuba.

     Tropical Storm Alberto subsequently turned northward but as the system
  was located in a high vertical shear environment, had strengthened to
  only 45 kts by the early morning of 12 June.    However, later that
  morning, a reconnaissance aircraft found that the center had reformed
  near the deep convection and the MSW was abruptly upped to 60 kts--the
  peak for Alberto.  As a precaution, a hurricane warning was issued for
  portions of the Florida coastline.   The storm's sudden strengthening
  had occurred over a region of high oceanic heat content--the Gulf Loop
  Current--but as Alberto turned northeastward and left the Loop Current
  behind, it began to slowly weaken.  The storm made landfall around
  midday on 13 June near Adams Beach in the Big Bend area of Florida,
  about 80 km southeast of Tallahassee, with the MSW near 45 kts.  Alberto
  weakened to a tropical depression on the 14th over Georgia and then
  emerged off the mid-Atlantic coast as an extratropical gale that night.
  The post-Alberto system accelerated northeastward, passing near the
  Canadian Maritimes, and then traversed the North Atlantic, nearing
  Ireland by the 18th.

     A graphic displaying the track of Tropical Storm Alberto up through
  extratropical transition may be found at the following link:

  http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/2006/A/BTI/2006-01L-ALBERTO.gif>

     Another graphic depicting the entire track may be found at the
  following link:

  http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/2006/A/BTI/2006-01L-ALBERTO-XT.gif>

     The track in tabular format may be accessed at the following URL:

  http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/2006/A/BT/2006-01L-BT.txt>

     The very detailed and informative Wikipedia report may be accessed
  at the following link:

  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropical_Storm_Alberto_(2006)>

     A few highlights gleaned from the Wikipedia report:

  (1) Grand Cayman recorded 577 mm of rainfall in association with Alberto.

  (2) Some stations in Cuba recorded in excess of 400 mm of rain.

  (3) The maximum rainfall for the U. S. was at Raleigh, NC, where 182 mm
      was measured.

  (4) Ruskin, FL, measured 170 mm while Rincon, GA, recorded 179 mm.

  (5) Two fatalities were attributed to Alberto:  the pilot of a small
      plane which crashed near Tampa, FL, and a 13-year old boy who
      drowned near Raleigh, NC.   In addition, nine people were reported
      missing after a boat supposedly sank off Boynton Beach Inlet, but
      this was later determined to be a hoax and the perpetrator arrested.

  (6) There were 16 tornadoes reported in association with Alberto.

  (Report written by Gary Padgett)

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHEAST PACIFIC (NEP) - North Pacific Ocean East of Longitude 180

  Activity for June:  1 tropical depression


                         Sources of Information
                         ----------------------

     Most of the information presented below was obtained from the
  various tropical cyclone products issued by the Tropical Prediction
  Center/National Hurricane Center (TPC/NHC) in Miami, Florida (or the
  Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) in Honolulu, Hawaii, for
  locations west of longitude 140W):  discussions, public advisories,
  forecast/advisories, tropical weather outlooks, special tropical
  disturbance statements, etc.  Some additional information may have
  been gleaned from the monthly summaries prepared by the hurricane
  specialists and available on TPC/NHC's website.  All references to
  sustained winds imply a 1-minute averaging period unless otherwise
  noted.


                 Northeast Pacific Tropical Activity for June
                 --------------------------------------------

     Over the 1971-2005 period of record, the Northeast Pacific basin has
  averaged two tropical storms per year with one reaching hurricane
  intensity.  No tropical storm formed in June, 2006, and this was only the
  second time since 1969 that the month of June was stormless--the other
  occasion being just two years earlier in 2004.  And even though over the
  long haul June has averaged one hurricane per year, the last Eastern
  Pacific hurricane to form in the month of June was Hurricane Carlotta in
  June, 2000.  Interestingly, the month of May, which averages a hurricane
  about once every four years, has seen three hurricanes during this
  hurricane-free June period.   In 2000 a hurricane formed in both May
  and June with May's Hurricane Aletta being the first Eastern Pacific
  May hurricane in ten years.

     One tropical depression did form during the month of June--Tropical
  Depression 02E.  This system developed from a tropical wave about 140
  miles southwest of Zihuatanejo, Mexico, on 3 June.  Although it never
  reached tropical storm intensity, its proximity to land and the
  uncertainty in the intensity forecast prompted the issuance of tropical
  storm warnings along the Mexican coast.  The depression meandered off
  the coast for a couple of days and brought heavy rainfall, flash floods
  and mud slides over portion of Mexico.  The system dissipated on 5 June
  as it interacted with land.  According to the Wikipedia report (see link
  following), Acapulco received between 250 and 300 mm of rain from the
  depression.

     The short Wikipedia report on Tropical Depression 02E may be accessed
  at the following link:

  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_Pacific_hurricane_season#Tropical_Depression_Two-E>

     A graphic depicting the track of Tropical Depression 02E may be found
  at the following link:

  http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/2006/E/BTI/2006-02E-TWO-E.gif>

     The track in tabular format may be accessed at the following URL:

  http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/2006/E/BT/2006-02E-BT.txt>

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHWEST PACIFIC (NWP) - North Pacific Ocean West of Longitude 180

  Activity for June:  2 tropical storms **

  ** - one formed on final day of month and became super typhoon in July


                         Sources of Information
                         ----------------------

     Most of the information presented below is based upon tropical
  cyclone warnings and significant tropical weather outlooks issued
  by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center of the U. S. Air Force and
  Navy (JTWC), located at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.   In the companion
  tropical cyclone tracks file, I normally annotate track coordinates
  from some of the various Asian warning centers when their center
  positions differ from JTWC's by usually 40-50 nm or more.   All
  references to sustained winds imply a 1-minute averaging period
  unless otherwise noted.

     Michael V. Padua of Naga City in the Philippines, owner of the
  Typhoon 2000 website, normally sends me cyclone tracks based upon
  warnings issued by the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the
  Philippines' Atmospheric, Geophysical & Astronomical Services
  Administration (PAGASA).  A very special thanks to Michael for the
  assistance he so reliably provides.
  
      In the title line for each storm I have referenced all the cyclone
  names/numbers I have available:   JTWC's depression number, the 
  JMA-assigned name (if any), JMA's tropical storm numeric designator,
  and PAGASA's name for systems forming in or passing through their
  area of warning responsibility.


                 Northwest Pacific Tropical Activity for June
                 --------------------------------------------

     Following the dissipation of Super Typhoon Chanchu in late May, the
  world's most active tropical cyclone basin lay dormant until late in
  June when a tropical disturbance crossed the Philippines into the South
  China Sea where it became Tropical Storm Jelawat.  This event, however,
  marked the beginning of an active spell in the Western Pacific which is
  still continuing at the present time (14 August).  Another tropical
  depression formed late in the month and at 1800 UTC on 30 June was
  upgraded by both JMA and JTWC to Tropical Storm Ewiniar.  Ewiniar became
  a strong typhoon in early July, briefly reaching super typhoon status
  per JTWC's analysis.  A short report on Jelawat, authored by Kevin Boyle,
  follows--Typhoon Ewiniar will be covered in the July summary.



                          TROPICAL STORM JELAWAT
                        (TC-03W / TS 0206 / DOMENG)
                               26 - 29 June
              -----------------------------------------------

  Jelawat: contributed by Malaysia, is the name of a freshwater carp also
           known as the Sultan fish.  This tasty fish normally inhabits
           large rivers and is much sought after by gourmets.

  A. Storm History
  ----------------

     Tropical Storm Jelawat was a relatively weak tropical storm that 
  brought heavy rains and flooding to southern parts of China.  After a 
  month's hiatus, Jelawat was the first of three significant tropical 
  cyclones marking the beginning of an active period in the Northwest 
  Pacific basin, beginning in late June and continuing into July. 

     At 0600 UTC 22 June an area of convection had persisted approximately 
  30 nm southeast of Palau.  It was first mentioned in JTWC's STWO when 
  animated multi-spectral satellite imagery showed convection consolidating
  over a possible LLCC.  An upper-level analysis indicated a low vertical 
  wind shear environment with favourable poleward outflow so further 
  development was expected.  The disturbance moved quickly westwards 
  across the southern Philippines as Tropical Depression Domeng (PAGASA 
  assigned this name at 24/0000 UTC) on 24-25 June and entered the South 
  China Sea the next day.  The system began to organize, prompting JTWC 
  to issue a TCFA at 25/2230 UTC, followed by the first warning at 
  26/0600 UTC.  At this time, Tropical Depression 03W was located 
  approximately 160 nm west-southwest of Manila, Philippines, and 
  drifting towards the west-northwest at 12 kts along the southwestern 
  periphery of a subtropical ridge. 

  (Editor's Note: PAGASA classified the pre-Jelawat system as a tropical 
  depression as early as 24/0000 UTC and upgraded it to a tropical storm 
  at 24/1200 UTC, well before either JMA or JTWC had classified it as a 
  depression.  So according to PAGASA's warnings, it was Tropical Storm
  Domeng which crossed the southern Philippines.)

     Tropical Depression 03W was raised to tropical storm status at 0000 
  UTC 27 June while centred approximately 345 nm south-southeast of Hong 
  Kong, China.  It was named Jelawat at 27/0600 UTC after JMA upgraded 
  the system to a 35-kt tropical storm.  Tropical Storm Jelawat followed 
  a predominantly northwestward track through the South China Sea and 
  reached its peak intensity of 45 kts at 27/1800 UTC as it was 
  approaching the island of Hainan, China.  Passing very near the 
  northeast coast of Hainan, Jelawat began to weaken and was downgraded 
  to a tropical depression at 28/1800 UTC.  Continuing northwestward, the 
  system made landfall near Zhanjiang, China, early on 29 June.  JMA and 
  JTWC issued their final warnings at 29/0000 UTC and 29/0600 UTC, 
  respectively.  

     JMA estimated a peak intensity of 40 kts (10-min avg) and minimum CP 
  of 994 mb while PAGASA estimated a maximum intensity of 40 kts also.

     Unfortunately, John Diebolt has had some problems with his track
  graphic database, and the graphic for Tropical Storm Jelawat is not
  available at this time.   Once John has gotten it restored, I will 
  include the link in a future summary.

     Jelawat's track in tabular format may be accessed at the following 
  URL:

  http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/database/2006/W/BT/2006-03W-BT.txt>

 
  B. Damage and Casualties
  ------------------------ 

     Tropical Storm Jelawat brought heavy rainfall and flooding to 
  Guangdong and Guangxi Provinces.  News reports indicate that seven people
  were killed with one reported missing. 

     The Wikipedia report for Jelawat may be accessed at the following 
  link:
  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_Pacific_typhoon_season#Tropical_Storm_Jelawat_.28Domeng.29>

     According to the Wikipedia report, Haikou, China, recorded 309.7 mm
  of rainfall in association with Jelawat.  Kampung, Malaysia, measured
  220 mm of rain in 16 hours.

  (Report written by Kevin Boyle)

  *************************************************************************

  NORTH INDIAN OCEAN (NIO) - Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea

  Activity for June:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  SOUTHWEST INDIAN OCEAN (SWI) - South Indian Ocean West of Longitude 90E

  Activity for June:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHWEST AUSTRALIA/SOUTHEAST INDIAN OCEAN (AUW) - From 90E to 135E

  Activity for June:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  NORTHEAST AUSTRALIA/CORAL SEA (AUE) - From 135E to 160E

  Activity for June:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

  SOUTH PACIFIC (SPA) - South Pacific Ocean East of Longitude 160E

  Activity for June:  No tropical cyclones

  *************************************************************************

         SPECIAL FEATURE - SOURCES OF TROPICAL CYCLONE INFORMATION

     The purpose of this section is to list some websites where many and
  varied types of tropical cyclone information are archived.  Many readers
  will know about these already, but for the benefit of those who don't,
  I wanted to include them. 

  (1) Aircraft Reconnaissance Information
  ---------------------------------------

     Various types of messages from reconnaissance aircraft may be
  retrieved from the following FTP site:

     ftp://ftp.nhc.noaa.gov/pub/products/nhc/recon/>

     Information regarding how to interpret the coded reconnaissance
  messages may be found at the following URL:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/reconlist.shtml>

  Links are also included to websites with further information about the
  U. S. Air Force 53rd Weather Reconnaissance Squadron and the NOAA Air-
  craft Operations Center.

  (2) Archived Advisories
  -----------------------

     All the advisory products (public advisories, forecast/advisories,
  strike probabilities, discussions, various graphics) issued by TPC/NHC
  are archived on TPC's website.  For the current year (using 2004 as an
  example), the archived products can be found at:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2004/index.shtml>

  Links to tropical products archives for earlier years are available at
  the following URL:

     http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastall.shtml>

  JTWC warnings for past storms are archived on the NRL Monterry website:

     http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html>

  On the NRL site, the link to past years can be found in the upper left 
  corner of the screen.

     I am not aware at the moment of any other TCWC which archives all
  its tropical cyclone warning/advisory products for public access, but
  if I learn of any, I will add them to this list.

  (3) Satellite Imagery
  ---------------------

     Satellite images of tropical cyclones in various sensor bands are
  available on the NRL Monterrey and University of Wisconsin websites,
  courtesy of Jeff Hawkins and Chris Velden and their associates.  The
  links are:

     http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html>

     http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/tropic/tropic.html>

  On the NRL site, the link to past years can be found in the upper left 
  corner of the screen.  For the CIMSS site, a link to data archives is 
  located in the lower left portion of the screen.

     Additional tropical satellite imagery, along with looping ability for
  composite microwave imagery for the Western Hemisphere north of the
  equator, can be found at:

  (1) For the Eastern North Pacific:

     http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/trop-epac.html>

  (2) For the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea:

     http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/trop-atl.html>

     I'm sure there are other sites with available imagery available, and
  as I learn of them, I will add the links to this list.

  *************************************************************************

                              EXTRA FEATURE

     In order to shorten the amount of typing in preparing the narrative
  material, I have been in the habit of freely using abbreviations and
  acronyms.   I have tried to define most of these with the first usage
  in a given summary, but I may have missed one now and then.  Most of
  these are probably understood by a majority of readers but perhaps a
  few aren't clear to some.  To remedy this I developed a Glossary of
  Abbreviations and Acronyms which I first included in the August, 1998
  summary.  I don't normally include the Glossary in most months in
  order to help keep them from being too long.  If anyone would like to
  receive a copy of the Glossary, please e-mail me and I'll be happy
  to send them a copy.

  *************************************************************************

  AUTHOR'S NOTE:  This summary should be considered a very preliminary 
  overview of the tropical cyclones that occur in each month. The cyclone
  tracks (provided separately) will generally be based upon operational
  warnings issued by the various tropical cyclone warning centers.  The
  information contained therein may differ somewhat from the tracking and
  intensity information obtained from a "best-track" file which is based
  on a detailed post-seasonal analysis of all available data. Information
  on where to find official "best-track" files from the various warning
  centers will be passed along from time to time.

    The track files are not being sent via e-mail.  They can be retrieved
  from the archive sites listed below.  (Note: I do have a limited e-mail
  distribution list for the track files.    If anyone wishes to receive
  these via e-mail, please send me a message.)

    Both the summaries and the track files are standard text files
  created in DOS editor.  Download to disk and use a viewer such as
  Notepad or DOS editor to view the files.

     The first summary in this series covered the month of October,
  1997.   Back issues can be obtained from the following websites
  (courtesy of Michael Bath, Michael V. Padua, Michael Pitt, Chris
  Landsea, and John Diebolt):

    http://australiasevereweather.com/cyclones/>
    http://www.typhoon2000.ph>
    http://mpittweather.com>
    ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/pub/landsea/padgett/>
    http://www.tropicalcyclone2005.com/>


     Another website where much information about tropical cyclones may
  be found is the website for the UK Meteorological Office.  Their site
  contains a lot of statistical information about tropical cyclones
  globally on a monthly basis.  The URL is:

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/tropicalcyclone>
    

                    TROPICAL CYCLONE REPORTS AVAILABLE

     JTWC now has available on its website the Annual Tropical Cyclone
  Report (ATCR) for 2004 (2003-2004 season for the Southern Hemisphere).
  ATCRs for earlier years are available also.

     The URL is:  http://199.10.200.33/jtwc.html>

     Also, TPC/NHC has available on its webpage nice "technicolor"
  tracking charts for the 2004 Atlantic and Eastern North Pacific
  tropical cyclones; also, storm reports for all the 2004 Atlantic
  and Eastern North Pacific cyclones are now available, as well as
  track charts and reports on storms from earlier years. 

     The URL is:  http://www.nhc.noaa.gov>


     A special thanks to Michael Bath of McLeans Ridges, New South Wales,
  Australia, for assisting me with proofreading the summaries.


  PREPARED BY

  Gary Padgett
  E-mail:  [email protected]
  Phone:  334-222-5327

  Kevin Boyle  (Eastern Atlantic, Western Northwest Pacific, South
                China Sea)
  E-mail:  [email protected]

  Simon Clarke  (Northeast Australia/Coral Sea, South Pacific)
  E-mail:  [email protected]

  *************************************************************************
  *************************************************************************

Document: summ0606.htm
Updated: 17th August 2006

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